Tag Archives: butter

5 common food myths

Myths about common foods that we eat are all over the internet, fitness and health shops and of course the gym. Once these ideas and ‘facts’ take hold they are exceptionally hard to shift.

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Here are the top 5 myths about  the foods we eat.

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#1 : Eggs are full of cholesterol and will lead to a heart attack

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eggs-1I plan on addressing this more fully in a later post because it definitely deserves further attention (I bloody love eggs). Eggs received a bad reputation a number of years ago and unfortunately this has stuck around. Many people mistakenly believe that eating eggs, especially the yolk, has a terrible effect on your cholesterol which increases risk of cardiac/circulatory issues.

It is true that elevated levels of LDL cholesterol is definitely bad for your health but eggs aren’t a significant contributory factor (1,2)

Eggs are a cheap and plentiful source of proteins, fats and an assortment of minerals. If you want to sneak some protein in quickly without spending a lot, eggs are perfect for you.

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#2 : Margarine is healthier than butter

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.I myself am a marge to butter convert. I used to eat margarine, not for any health reason, but because I simply always had. I switched to butter a few years ago after being insulted for eating margarine. ‘what is this bullshit’ people would say when searching for butter in the morning and finding a massive tub of Utterly Butterly or as ALDI calls it, Wonderfly Butterfly ( I love ‘almost’ copyright infringement)

There’s not much difference in calorie content between marge and butter but margarine often contains much higher levels of trans-fats. Eating lots of trans fats is linked to numerous health problems. (3)

Magarine was created as a cheaper and healthier alternative to butter but can actually end up way worse for you in the long run (4). On top of that butter tastes far better!

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#3 : Eat an orange to prevent colds

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I have written  extensively about the role vitamins play in our day to day health and how vitamin supplements, for the average person, are a massive waste of money.

There is a commonly held belief hat vitamin C, found in large amounts in oranges, can prevent or cure common colds.

Neither is true (5).

Vitamin C only seems to play a role in limiting cold duration in specific scenarios involving intensive exercise in cold environments (6)

For a more in depth read about the multivitamin scam take a look here.

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#4 : Go with fat-free alternatives to lose weight

 

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The issue that food manufactures have, especially with more processed foods, is that fat = flavour. If you remove fat from a product in an attempt to create a healthier product then the flavour has to come from somewhere. The answer? Sugar.

This has proved to be a short sighted and potentially health-damaging decision.

Fat has been demonised for decades (mainly due to the power of global corporations that produce sugar-filled products) and the public, and even the government (based on their eating guidelines) believe eating fat is to blame for the obesity epidemic. This has been more heavily scrutinised in recent months following the publishing of a damning report on the topic.

The truth is much more complicated and companies adding sugar to everything in place of fat is nothing but detrimental. In most cases, you would be better off eating the full fat version as the quantity of sugar found in fat-free versions of processed products is preposterous.

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#5 Canned food is less nutritious and ‘healthy’ than fresh

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This all depends on timing. If vegetables and fruit are picked in front of you and you eat them  right there, the fresh stuff will be more nutritious.

However, if we are comparing products in a supermarket the story is reversed. Canning or freezing food essentially fixes it as it was just as it was sealed away – hopefully full of nutrients. In comparison, although visibly fresh, fruit and veg lying around in supermarkets is on a constant downwards nutritional slope from the moment it is picked, all through transport  to the moment you buy and then finally eat it (7).

There is nothing wrong with canned or frozen fruit and veg – in fact, sometimes it might beat the ‘fresh’ version. Taste is another matter!

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Well there you go. Enjoy your canned eggs with butter.

 

-Science Guy

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References

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1) Rong, Ying; Chen, Li; Tingting, Zhu; Yadong, Song; Yu, Miao; Shan, Zhilei; Sands, Amanda; Hu, Frank B; et al. (2013). “Egg consumption and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies”. British Medical Journal. 346

2) Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Rimm EB, et al. (1999). “A prospective study of egg consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease in men and women”. JAMA. 281 (15): 1387–94.

3) K. Hayakawa, Y.Y. Linko, P. Linko, “The role of trans fatty acids in human nutrition,” Journal of Lipid Science and Technology102, 419–425 (2000)

4) Zaloga GP, Harvey KA, Stillwell W, Siddiqui R (2006). “Trans Fatty Acids and Coronary Heart Disease”. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 21 (5): 505–512.

5) Hemilä H, Chalker E (January 2013). “Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold”. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

6) Douglas RM, Hemilä H (June 2005). “Vitamin C for Preventing and Treating the Common Cold”. PLoS Medicine. 2(6)

7) S.D. Holdsworth (1985) ”Optimisation of thermal processing – A review” Campden Food Preservation Research Association.