Tag Archives: bodybuilding

5 Best mass-building exercises: A quick guide

Not all exercises were created equal. Compound exercises recruit the greatest amount of muscle fibre ultimately stimulating greater muscle growth when performed correctly. You will also be able to lift the most amount of weight compared to any other excercise hence why the bench press, squat and dead lift are the best measure of true strength.

In my opinion, compound exercises should always be your priority followed by isolation exercises which target individual muscles. Although pure bodybuilders spend a lot of time performing isolation exercises, almost all will include a mix of compound lifts in their training. The true greats like Ronnie Coleman swear by the big compound lifts.

All diagrams I’ve used have been taken from Strength Training Anatomy, a brilliant book which I was given when I first started lifting. Understanding how your body is put together is a massive bonus when ironing out issues in form.

I’ve included suggested weight goals at the bottom of each entry. In most circumstances, a larger, heavier person should be expected to lift more than someone smaller (if both have a descent muscle base). However, simply due to body layout, an extremely heavy person, even if very muscled will find it harder to lift twice their body weight than a smaller, but still heavily muscled person. In other words as your weight increases the amount you are expected to lift increases at a slower rate.

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For example a 60 kg man is expected to squat 126 kg to be considered in the advanced level.

A 100 kg man needs to squat  195 kg to be at the same level.

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I’m average height and fairly stocky so that plays to my advantage. If you are between 65-100 kg, the suggestions can apply to you. If you are oddly tall and or very heavy then you can find online calculators to help you determine your goals.

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#1 : Squat

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Debate still persists about the King Of Excercises. Is it the squat or is it the dead lift? Although I prefer squatting I still think the title belongs to the deadlift. However. There is no greater leg/lower body exercise overall than the squat. Hands down. I don’t think anyone would disagree.  The squat is a hard exercise to perform because it is so physically demanding. The proof? Everyone with tiny legs in the gym with a huge upper body. Bench pressing may be hard on the chest but it simply doesn’t compare to lower body work.

Squatting heavy and with good form will develop your glutes, quads, lower back and hamstrings (to a lesser degree). It also puts tremendous pressure on the core and will develop it accordingly. If you can, I would always avoid using a weight lifting belt until necessary to promote increased core strength which belt use may detract from.

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.Muscles used:

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squat

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Brief how to:

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squat-2

Key points to remember:

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  • Check your bar positioning – don’t rest it on the neck itself.
  • Head in a neutral position, don’t look down or too far up
  • Chest up and out
  • Tight and straight back with equal hand positions on the bar
  • Equally spaced footing (width is up to you) with feet slightly turned out
  • Drive through the whole foot, don’t rock onto the balls of the feet – this may force you to lean forward
  • Get nice and deep – cheat the depth and you cheat yourself

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Initial weight goal: Body weight +

Advanced weight goal: 2 X body weight

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#2 : Dead lift

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Argued to be the king of exercises,  the dead lift is another hard exercise which explains why lots of people neglect to perform it properly or simply don’t do it at all. The dead lift involves more muscles than any other exercise – because of this it could be considered the single greatest mass building lift. Huge pressure is placed on the legs, the entire back, core and also the shoulders.

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Muscles used:

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deadlift1

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Brief how to:

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deadlift2

Key points to remember:

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  • Neutral but tight back position- avoid rounding your back and shoulders
  • Don’t ‘squat your dead lift’ – pay attention to your hip positioning
  • Equally spaced grip – numerous grip types can work
  • Dont hyper extend at the top of the lift
  • Avoid bouncing the bar on the floor between reps – lift the weight from a ‘dead’ position

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Initial weight goal: Body weight +

Advanced weight goal: 2  and 1/2  X body weight


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#3 : Bench Press

 

This will probably rank as most casual gym users favourtie exercise and it is definately up there for me as well. Most men would kill for a large and well developed chest and the bench press is key in achieving this goal. The bench press puts major pressure on the pectorals but when performed correctly will also develop certain parts of the shoulder and of course the triceps.  The bench press can be performed in three main ways depending on bench position : incline, flat and decline. The flat bench is usually the ‘go to’ position but mixing angles will help help develop a well rounded chest and also contribute to greater benching strength overall. 

 

Muscles used and a brief how to:

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bench-press

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Brief how to (variations):

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bench-2

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Key points to remember:

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  • Equally spaced hand grip – can experiment to target different parts of the chest
  • Use the thumbless grip at your own risk!
  • The bench press can be performed flat, inclined or declined – all have their benefits
  • Avoid extreme flared elbows
  • Don’t bounce the bar off your sternum
  • Keep tight legs and plant feet firmly on the ground
  • Keep butt on the bench – don’t arch your back and rise of the bench mid-lift
  • Both the eccentric (down) and concentric (up) part of the lift are important for maximum muscle growth and strength gain (this is true of most exercises)

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Initial weight goal: 80% body weight

Advanced weight goal: 1 and 1/2 times body weight

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#4 : Military Press

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Not a member of the ‘Big Three’, the military press is still a powerful compound lift that can build your shoulders and core (when standing) and should form part of your shoulder routine. The press can be performed seated or standing. Standing press has the added benefit of building quality core stength as the bar must be stabalised above your head whilst standing. I often switch to a seated position to really focus on shoulder contractions using a lighter weight after performing the standing variation. 

This is a tough exercise – lifting things directly above the head is difficult and a number of people at my gym have a decent bench press but possess terrible over head press strength. Developing your weakest lift will improve the others. If you feeel you shoulder size and strength are lacking then include standing military press in your workout.

The shoulder is a very complex joint jam packed with nerves (brachial plexus). Shoulder aches, twangs and pains are very common – often the result of poor exercise form or simply going far too heavy. If your form is good then military press is no more dangerous than any other compound lift.

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Muscles used:

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shoulder1

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Brief how to (variations):

shoulder-32

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Key points to remember:

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  • Use strict form for intial sets to maximise shoulder use – only use leg drive for those final reps (if you must)
  • Lower the bar all the way to the upper chest – half repping makes the lift much easier but wont result in the same strength or size gains
  • A wider grip puts greater strain across the shoulders
  • Squeezing the butt at the top of the lift can reduce lower back arch with heavier weights

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Key points to remember:

Initial weight goal: 60% body weight

Advanced weight goal: Body weight +

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#5 : Bent Over Row

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6 time Mr Olympia, Dorian Yates, swore by this exercise for building upper body depth. He’s certainly not wrong. The bent over barebell row is a quality exercise that stimualtes growth across the entire back. Although good mornings and romanian deadlifts stimualte the lower back to a greater degree, the bent over row is fantastic for the mid-upper back. Greater emphasis can be placed on different parts of the back depending on hip positioning.

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Muscles used:

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back

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Brief how to:

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backd1

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Key points to remember:

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  • Varying your grip can put increased pressure on different back muscles
  • Changing your hip position can also place empahsis on different parts of the back
  • Avoid rocking the weight upwards with momentum: this makes the lift easier and reduces muscle work
  • Keep the head up and back straight (always avoid curving the back)
  • Legs slightly bent
  • Training your back well can really help with arm development
  • The one armed variant is great for working specific parts of the back

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Initial weight goal: 80%body weight

Advanced weight goal: 120% body weight

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There we have it. The top 5 mass builders. They may be physically demanding but they are 100% worth it. if you aren’t already performing these exercises then make them part of your routine – you will notice massive improvements in your physique and strength over time.

Don’t forget to check out ‘4 common weight lifting mistakes’ and soon you will be king of the gym.

Feeling like you are missing something from your workout? Small changes in your technique and your equipment can make a massive difference to your lifts. Liquid lifting chalk massively improved my grip strength and entriely removes bar slip issues. It’s cheap and can be used in all lifts where a barebell is used – I never go to the gym without it!

                           

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Any questions? Reach me at ed@scienceguysupplements.com

-ScienceGuy